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How to DIY a Pull Out Pantry [Easy Tutorial]

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Inside: A tutorial for how to build a solid pull out pantry that fits in the space beside your fridge! This roll-out pantry and rolling cupboard will save you space and holds more than just a spice rack.

After planning our kitchen revamp, we decided we wanted a pantry to use all the space beside the refrigerator.

We first thought we’d purchase one from Ikea – but after careful measuring, we realized it was going to be 3″ too big. This was the beginning of this DIY pull out pantry project!

The ones offered from box stores were all too wide by a long shot. So we decided on a small space storage solution!

How to DIY a Pull Out Pantry [Easy Tutorial]
Build a Pull Out Pantry

Today, I’m sharing how we built a DIY Pull Out Pantry. These plans can easily be adapted to be smaller for a below counter spice rack or rolling pantry cabinet depending on your space.

While you’re here, I’m assuming you are a small space dweller like we are, you might also want to check out how I keep my kitchen decluttered, my best tips for organizing a small linen cupboard, and also how we live with our small kitchen without renovating!

This post contains affiliate links – see our disclosure policy here.

Supply List for a DIY Pull Out Pantry Unit

Well, we researched and found a post for a canned food organizer shelf by Classy Clutter.

We decided to modify the plans to make it bigger and able to hold more things. 

“I want a pantry that Holds ALL THE THINGS!” It doesn’t do THAT, but it holds almost everything that was previously in our upper cabinets.

How to build a DIY Rolling Pantry

Space Saving DIY Pull out Pantry

This free-standing unit is ideal for small space dwellers or renters. And it was a key element in our entire kitchen renovation.

The beautiful part is that the entire thing cost us less than $140 to build and IT’S PRACTICALLY THE BEST THING EVER. 

Let’s dive right into this DIY pull out pantry and learn how to build a vertical pull-out cabinet to make the most of your available storage space.

Step 1:

Rolling Pantry 10, Supply List for a DIY Pull Out Pantry Unit

We wanted it to be roughly the same height and depth as the fridge once all was said and done, so I first drew up plans to determine just how much wood we’d need.  

Having the plans made building quite straightforward. I simply measured and cut the pine planks for the frame, then measured and cut the shelves.

Step 2:

Rolling Pantry 11

With some excess I had left, I cut a bunch of ‘strips’ from the planks, knowing that I’d later need shelf supports.

Using a square, I built the frame of the pantry. I affixed everything together using wood glue and wood screws.

Sure, nails would have been less visible, but ultimately, much less strong. We wanted this pantry to hold ALL THE THINGS.

Taking a cue from Classy Clutter, I doubled up the bottom shelf for reasons I’ll explain later.

Step 3:

Rolling Pantry 12, pull out pantry diy

Then I simply measured and marked where we wanted each shelf.  

The small strips mentioned above were glued and screwed below each marking at either side of the inner frame, so that the shelves could simply rest on them.

The middle shelf was screwed in and secured further with nails. The others (at this point) are just resting on the supports and are removable.

Step 4:

Rolling Pantry 13, diy rolling spice rack

We determined the height of the shelves based on the size of our storage canisters, and typical food stuffs. We knew the bottom shelf would be used for the tallest items.

Initially, we were going to have six shelves, but settled on five – given that let us store these taller things.

So, with the sixth shelf, I had already cut, I made a rip cut (lengthwise cut) with the circular saw and used it as an extra support brace for the middle and bottom shelves.

Step 5:

Rolling Pantry 14, how to build a pull out pantry

The next step was stenciling the white side of the Masonite for the back part of the pantry.

We chose Masonite to keep the unit as light as possible. We had it cut to size at the hardware store.

Plywood would work too, just consider that will add to the weight of your finished pantry.  

Initially, I started with a foam brush, but then decided a foam roller was the most efficient way to do it. Once the shelves were in place, I marked where I wanted the dowels to go.

We decided against a dowel on the very bottom shelf, because we knew we’d likely store cereal boxes there and there was little danger of something falling off and injuring someone.

Step 6:

Rolling Pantry 16, rolling spice rack next to stove

I marked where I wanted the dowel, used a level to make sure it was straight, and with a large drill bit (the same size as the dowel) made a hole on either end of the frame.

We decided to make our dowels go ‘through and through’ so that we can remove them for easy cleaning access.

Step 7:

Rolling Pantry 15, pantry beside fridge

I added our four casters to the bottom using wood screws. Here’s where that doubled up bottom comes into play.

Had I not layered a second plank on the bottom of the frame, the caster screws would have been too long.

Step 8:

Rolling Pantry 17, spice rack beside fridge

Before painting, I went back and filled all the nail holes and wood holes with paintable wood filler. I also ran a bead of caulking down the sides of the very bottom shelf to prevent crumbs from getting forever stuck down there. 

Then the whole thing got a light sanding.

Step 9:

Rolling Pantry 18, diy pull out spice rack

Next, together we primed the wood with stain-blocking primer and painted the wood with latex paint in a hue to match our kitchen cabinets.

You can see the rolling spice rack next to fridge in our finished kitchen here.

Step 10:

Rolling Pantry 19, spice rack between refrigerator and wall

We brought it into the kitchen for the final assembly.

The shelves were doubly secured with a few extra brad nails and the back board was affixed using our handy dandy Ryobi AirStriker Nail Gun.

Seriously, HOW did we live before we had this tool? We use it for SO much now. Recommend.

Step 11:

Make your own Pull-out Pantry, storage next to fridge

The long drawer pull was added to the front so that it can be pulled in and out with ease.

Then, the new pantry was loaded up! It holds TONS of stuff and there is no way that I would change this pantry next to fridge.

We freed up a boatload of space in our cupboards for dishes and serving ware. Indeed a roll-out pantry next to the fridge is a great way to store spices, snacks, and even dishes!

Final thoughts on our DIY Pull Out Pantry Project

DIY Rolling Pantry | DIY Passion, diy pull out pantry

A word on safety – there is still the potential for ‘tipping’. Ours is completely held in place by the wall and the fridge.

Due to its size, it’s actually quite difficult (and uncomfortable) to pull it out beyond that point.

We are confident that the fridge gap slide-out pantry is completely secure.

BUT – you could go the extra step and put some sort of rubber stopper on the ground to make sure it doesn’t get pulled out too far.

We are IN LOVE with this project. It was fairly straightforward to do. And it gave us space to store (almost) ALL THE THINGS!!

Please make also sure to have a look at my post about finishing touches in a kitchen, in order to give your DIY pull out pantry the ultimate power look!

Benefits of a Rolling Kitchen Pantry

Benefits of a Rolling Kitchen Pantry

Organising a kitchen aesthetically and effectively is not an easy task. It requires creativity, patience, and time.

One of the effective ways to store things in a modern kitchen is installing a rolling-out pantry. Pantry cabinets provide a great deal of storage space.

In terms of design, the roll-out pantry next to the fridge can be the best option. Here are some of the benefits of a sliding pantry.

  1. Increased Storage- Installing a roll-out pantry next to the fridge offers a lot of space to store canned goods. Even store small bottles, or the stuff that might get lost if not kept at a fixed place. This can help you utilize the pantry cabinets that you might not have otherwise used.
  2. More accessible- Pull-out storage next to the fridge will automatically make the cabinet easier to use. Items you store at the back of the shelf are not easily reachable but when you use the sliding shelves, everything can be stored in front. Even placing them at the back, you can pull out the shelf and easily get the stuff.
  3. Better organization- By installing the roll-out cabinets, your task of pantry organization will become easier and convenient. It is intimidating to store cans or containers on top of each other.

But in the sliding pantry, you can utilize the corners and left-out spaces under the shelf and store everything easily.

The Roll-out pantry is great to use next to the fridge or throughout the kitchen because they utilize the extra space.

More Next to Fridge Storage Ideas

More Next to Fridge Storage Ideas

There are often a few spaces left between the fridge and the wall beside it. You cannot let it go in vain, instead, utilise the space to store some canned goods.

With only a few tools and creative ideas, you can utilize the space in the kitchen and store some stuff. These beside fridge storage ideas below are going to help.

• Stash Wine

You can store the wine collection even on a narrow cupboard and the space beside the fridge would be perfect to place it. Use either an existing cabinet or build one. The cubbies beside the fridge would be ideal for all the bottles you own.

• Add a slide-out pantry

The few inches next to the fridge are enough to store some spices and canned goods. There are numerous helpful tutorials for kitchen storage and turn the wasted space into a storage pantry.

• Slash linens

Use a good-textured basket to cover things that you want to hide from the site. Conceal linens and small stuff using baskets in the space between the fridge and the wall.

You can hide much of the random stuff behind the fridge storage.

• Display cookbooks

If it is possible to build narrow and tall shelves, they will be perfect cookbooks. Or, if there is a little more space, fit a cabinet or a small shelf to clean up the litter in the house.

It can be even be used as kitchen storage to keep foldable stools or oversized boards.

Other Space Saving Kitchen and Pantry Ideas for you to try

rolling pantry shelves
DIY Vintage Mug Rack

If you really want to take advantage of vertical space, why not build your own DIY hanging mug rack?

Make your own Pull-out Pantry
Yield: DIY Pull Out Pantry

How to DIY a Pull Out Pantry

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Active Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Difficulty: Moderate
Estimated Cost: $10

Inside: A tutorial for how to build a solid pull out pantry that fits in the space beside your fridge! This roll-out pantry and rolling cupboard will save you space and holds more than just a spice rack.

After planning our kitchen revamp, we decided we wanted a pantry to use all the space beside the refrigerator.

We first thought we’d purchase one from Ikea – but after careful measuring, we realized it was going to be 3″ too big. This was the beginning of this DIY pull out pantry project!

The ones offered from box stores were all too wide by a long shot. So we decided on a small space storage solution!

Materials

  • 36 feet of pine boards (we bought six, 6’x 8″ lengths of knotty pine)
  • a sheet of Masonite for the backing
  • 4 non-swivel casters
  • wood screws
  • Five 3/4″ dowels
  • stain blocking primer

Tools

  • wood glue
  • paintable wood filler
  • latex paint
  • stencil
  • acrylic paint
  • foam roller (optional)
  • nail gun – WE LOVE this one!
  • circular saw
  • power drill
  • drill bits large enough for your dowels
  • paintable caulk
  • caulking gun
  • medium grit sandpaper
  • measuring tape
  • square
  • level

Instructions

  1. Having the plans made building quite straightforward. I simply measured and cut the pine planks for the frame, then measured and cut the shelves.
  2. Using a square, I built the frame of the pantry. I affixed everything together using wood glue and wood screws.
  3. Then I simply measured and marked where we wanted each shelf. The small strips mentioned above were glued and screwed below each marking at either side of the inner frame so that the shelves could simply rest on them.
  4. The middle shelf was screwed in and secured further with nails. The others (at this point) are just resting on the supports and are removable.
  5. So, with the sixth shelf, I had already cut, I made a rip cut (lengthwise cut) with the circular saw and used it as an extra support brace for the middle and bottom shelves.
  6. The next step was stenciling the white side of the Masonite for the back part of the pantry.
  7. Initially, I started with a foam brush but then decided a foam roller was the most efficient way to do it. Once the shelves were in place, I marked where I wanted the dowels to go.
  8. We decided against a dowel on the very bottom shelf, because we knew we’d likely store cereal boxes there and there was little danger of something falling off and injuring someone.
  9. I marked where I wanted the dowel, used a level to make sure it was straight, and with a large drill bit (the same size as the dowel) made a hole on either end of the frame.
  10. I added our four casters to the bottom using wood screws. Here’s where that doubled up bottom comes into play.
  11. Before painting, I went back and filled all the nail holes and wood holes with paintable wood filler.
  12. Then the whole thing got a light sanding.
  13. Next, together we primed the wood with a stain-blocking primer and painted the wood with latex paint in a hue to match our kitchen cabinets.
  14. We brought it into the kitchen for the final assembly.
  15. The shelves were doubly secured with a few extra brad nails and the backboard was affixed using our handy dandy Ryobi AirStriker Nail Gun.
  16. The long drawer pull was added to the front so that it can be pulled in and out with ease.

Then, the new pantry was loaded up!

Did you make this project?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Pinterest


Short FAQ about DIY Pull Out Pantry

How to build a pull-out pantry?

Building a pull-out pantry is surprisingly easy!
1. Having the plans made building quite straightforward. I simply measured and cut the pine planks for the frame, then measured and cut the shelves.
2. Using a square, I built the frame of the pantry. I affixed everything together using wood glue and wood screws.
3. Then I simply measured and marked where we wanted each shelf. The small strips mentioned above were glued and screwed below each marking at either side of the inner frame so that the shelves could simply rest on them.
4. The middle shelf was screwed in and secured further with nails. The others (at this point) are just resting on the supports and are removable.

How to install shelves in pantry?

It is quite easy to install shelves in a pantry. First, measure your cabinet width, or an existing shelf.
Second, cut additional shelves for each cabinet. Finally, aArrange them to make the most of your storage space.

How to fill space next to refrigerator?

If you’re looking how to fill a space next to refrigerator, a pull out pantry is a great idea! It’s a rolling spice rack and storage space for dishes, food and so much more. On top, it’s easy to doi it yourself.


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Deb

Saturday 10th of October 2020

Thank you! I just finished my pantry. I used contact paper on the back instead of painting it.

mitch is a scammer

Wednesday 20th of November 2019

Burkettes BillyBurke MitchMorgan MitchMonday ZOO 01x01 "First https://www.newchartertech.com/

Mike Brandt

Tuesday 27th of August 2019

Super idea and if you have a deeper than normal void ( normal being 60 to 75cm then a longer version will provide what mass manufacture cannot. As for stability, if along a wall, a guide rail at the top with a couple of runners on could keep it stable and topple free. Think we might try this.

Best Folding Wagon

Saturday 5th of May 2018

I am surprised this article did not mention bed risers again because a raised bed not only provides under storage but also enables the use of taller bedside furniture gaining extra drawers or shelves. I use bed risers in the guest room antique iron bed but had the deck welded higher on my new iron bedstead. With vintage suitcases or trunks showing under it pleases me.

Tara

Saturday 20th of January 2018

What is the cost of the raw materials?

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